Bjorn is Aslaug’s kid in canon.
Even if partial canon is accepted, he and Hastein become a crazy power duo, and even other sons like Ivar the Boneless joins up later.
Seriously, that would be some crazy shit. Saga-worthy, but cray-cray.
  • Bjorn is Aslaug’s kid in canon.
  • Even if partial canon is accepted, he and Hastein become a crazy power duo, and even other sons like Ivar the Boneless joins up later.
  • Seriously, that would be some crazy shit. Saga-worthy, but cray-cray.

(via vikings-confessions)

tuulikki:

blindthoughts:

This is the gif portal to the dream world of your choice. 

No, this means a Black Rider is about to show up so you should get your hobbit ass off the road.

tuulikki:

blindthoughts:


This is the gif portal to the dream world of your choice. 

No, this means a Black Rider is about to show up so you should get your hobbit ass off the road.

"The Saga of Biorn" — a little something to watch while waiting for the new season.  ;)  (Posted by argyle4eva.)

VIKINGS: The Destinies

derpymedia:

Lagertha:

After returning to Denmark to fight a civil war, Ragnar divorced Lagertha in order to marry Þóra Town-Hart, the daughter of King Herrauðr of Sweden.  He won the hand of his new love after numerous adventures, but upon returning to Denmark was again faced with a civil war. He sent to Norway for support, and Lagbjorertha, who still loved him, came to his aid with 120 ships.  When at the height of the battle, Ragnar’s son Siward was wounded, Lagertha saved the day for Ragnar with a counterattack:

Upon returning to Norway, she quarreled with her (new?) husband, and slew him with a spearhead she concealed in her gown. Accounts conclude that she then “usurped the whole of his name and sovereignty; for this most presumptuous dame thought it pleasanter to rule without her husband than to share the throne with him”

Aslaug:

Once as she was bathing, she was discovered by some of the men of Ragnar Lodbrok, the legendary Viking king. Confused by her beauty, they allowed the bread they were baking to be burnt, and when Ragnar enquired about this mishap, they told him about the girl. Ragnar then sent for her, but in order to test her wits, he commanded her neither to arrive dressed nor undressed, neither hungry nor full and neither alone nor in company. Aslaug arrived dressed in a net, biting an onion and with only the dog as a companion. Impressed by her ingenuity, and finding her a wise companion, Ragnar proposed marriage to her, which she refused until he had accomplished his mission in Norway. She gave him four sons, Ivar the Boneless, Björn Ironside, Hvitserk and Ragnvald.

When Ragnar visited viceroy Östen Beli of Sweden, Östen persuaded him to reject Aslaug and marry the Swedish princess Ingeborg. On his return home, three birds had already informed Aslaug of Ragnar’s plans, and so she reproached him and told him of her true noble origins. In order to prove that she was the daughter of Sigurd who had slain Fafnir, she said that she would bear a child whose eye would bear the image of a serpent. This happened and she bore the son Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye. When Östen learnt of Ragnar’s change of mind, he rebelled against him, but was slain by Ragnar’s sons at Aslaug’s behest.

When Ragnar was about to undertake his fated expedition to England, his failure was due to his not heeding Aslaug’s warnings about the bad condition of the fleet. When Ragnar had been thrown into the snake pit by king AElla, he was protected by an enchanted shirt that Aslaug had made. It was only when this shirt had been removed that the snakes could bite Ragnar and kill him.

Bjorn (Ironsides):

A powerful Viking chieftain and naval commander, Björn and his brother Hastein conducted manyraids in France in a continuation of the tradition initiated by their father Ragnar Lodbrok. In 860, Björn led a large Viking raid into the Mediterranean. After raiding down the Spanish coast and fighting their way through Gibraltar, Björn and Hastein pillaged the south of France, where his fleet over-wintered, before landing in Italy where they captured the coastal city of Pisa. They proceeded inland to the town of Luna, which they believed to be Rome at the time, but Björn found himself unable to breach the town walls. To gain entry, he sent messengers to the bishop to say that he had died, had a deathbed conversion, and wished to be buried on consecrated ground within their church. He was brought into the chapel with a small honor guard, then amazed the dismayed Italian clerics by leaping from his coffin and hacking his way to the town gates, which he promptly opened, letting his army in. Flush with this victory and others around the Mediterranean (including in Sicily and North Africa) he returned to the Straits of Gibraltar only to find the Saracen navy waiting. In the desperate battle that followed, Björn lost 40 ships, largely to Greek fire launched from Saracen catapults. The remainder of his fleet managed to return to Scandinavia, however, where he lived out his life as a rich man.

RAGNAR/King AElla

Ragnar wanted to outdo his sons, and decided to conquer England with only two ships. King AElla of Northumbria defeated Ragnar and threw him into a snake pit where he died.

Björn and his brothers attacked AElla but were beaten back. Asking for peace and wergild, Ivar the Boneless tricked AElla into giving him an area large enough to build the town of York. Ivar made himself popular in England and asked his brothers to attack again. During the battle Ivar sided with his brothers and so did many of the English chieftains with their people, in loyalty to Ivar. AElla was taken captive and in revenge they carved the blood eagle on him.

Don’t underestimate Viking women

archaeologicalnews:

image

The status of Viking women may be underestimated due to the way we interpret burial findings.

“To assume that Viking men were ranked above women is to impose modern values on the past, which would be misleading,” cautions Marianne Moen. She has been studying how women’s status and power is expressed through Viking burial findings. Her master’s thesis The Gendered Landscape argues that viking gender roles may have been more complex than we assume.

Exploring new perspectives of Viking society is a theme which also will be the focus of the forthcoming Viking Worlds conference in March 2013, where Moen is a member of the organising committee. Read more.

bydbach:

no-ergi:

bydbach:

so …

i’ve started watching vikings two days ago and i really enjoy it in a guilty-pleasure-off-with-their-limbs-and-wait-a-minute-how-did-they-get-that-around-the-MPAA?-more-naked-menfolk-HOORAY kind of way … but from the first episode onwards one thing keeps puzzling and bugging me:

WHERE THE HELL IS THIS SUPPOSED TO BE SET?!?!!?? it makes NO sense?!?!?!? there’s only one place in scandinavia that has such kind of fjords and that’s norway. which makes the whole “going east to russia” a bit non-sensical and the “going west to england” just as unlikely. because if they truly went west, they’d either hit the rocky shores of northern scotland or end up a bit further west in iceland. so in order to  make those west/east directions plausible, the series would have to be set in southern sweden or northern denmark — which are both flat as a pancake. but, hey, at least those fjords look pretty.

(and don’t get me started on kattegat. because that’s really a strait and not a town. i’m generally shite at geography, but i can still tell the difference between land and water!)

and people say the imaginary/bogus geography in “lawrence of arabia” was bad …

For the purposes of your sanity, pretend that the show is set in a magical fantasy land with striking similarities to our own reality, but no actual connection.

Obviously we can conclude that Denmark was subject to the same devastating erosion that destroyed the once-stunning and dramatic-pose-facilitating coastal cliffs of Virginia.

image

I call it “Pocahontas Erosion Theory”, with credit due to the Nostalgia Chick. 

But of course, this is the History Channel, so there’s a good chance that aliens are responsible.

“pocahontas erosion theory”?

image

i’ll drink to that!

image

#vikings #where geography is just another state of mind

Cheers, my friend.

bydbach:

so …

i’ve started watching vikings two days ago and i really enjoy it in a guilty-pleasure-off-with-their-limbs-and-wait-a-minute-how-did-they-get-that-around-the-MPAA?-more-naked-menfolk-HOORAY kind of way … but from the first episode onwards one thing keeps puzzling and bugging me:

WHERE THE HELL IS THIS SUPPOSED TO BE SET?!?!!?? it makes NO sense?!?!?!? there’s only one place in scandinavia that has such kind of fjords and that’s norway. which makes the whole “going east to russia” a bit non-sensical and the “going west to england” just as unlikely. because if they truly went west, they’d either hit the rocky shores of northern scotland or end up a bit further west in iceland. so in order to  make those west/east directions plausible, the series would have to be set in southern sweden or northern denmark — which are both flat as a pancake. but, hey, at least those fjords look pretty.

(and don’t get me started on kattegat. because that’s really a strait and not a town. i’m generally shite at geography, but i can still tell the difference between land and water!)

and people say the imaginary/bogus geography in “lawrence of arabia” was bad …

For the purposes of your sanity, pretend that the show is set in a magical fantasy land with striking similarities to our own reality, but no actual connection.

What you’re getting is a a show which is throwing together the navigational theories of how the Norwegians sailed to Iceland and points west, a portrayal of the raid on Lindisfarne, and the Ragnar Loðbrók legend.

Obviously sailing from Denmark towards “somewhere west” is not too fraught with peril.

image

If you weren’t feeling like blue-water sailing, you could just cruise down the coasts towards Dover, and even if you did fuck up, the North Atlantic Current would probably just drop you off at Norway.

The sailing west thing with the sun compass and all that jazz is just lifted from the stories and theories about how the Norwegians found Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. Making it about finding England is battier than the Dracula family reunion.

As far as the physical geography goes, since the Ragnar Loðbrók of legend was a Dane, we have to assume that he’s sailing out of Denmark.

We can rest assured that the History Channel is portraying things with 100% accuracy, so you are quite right to wonder what happened to the epic fjords of Denmark as seen in the show. We have further attestation of the topographical majesty of past!Denmark from the Beowulf movie with Ray Winstone, so I think we’ve got some reliable sources to show that Denmark once had, like, really awesome mountains.

Obviously we can conclude that Denmark was subject to the same devastating erosion that destroyed the once-stunning and dramatic-pose-facilitating coastal cliffs of Virginia.

image

I call it “Pocahontas Erosion Theory”, with credit due to the Nostalgia Chick. 

But of course, this is the History Channel, so there’s a good chance that aliens are responsible.

At that time heathens belched forth from Norse and Danish lands with the son of King Lothbroc, named Björn Ironside, whose expedition was organized by Hasting, the most wicked of all pagans. They invaded the coastal areas, laying waste and destroying towns and burning monasteries.

William of Jumièges, Gesta Normannorum ducum

Behold, the first reference to a guy named “Loðbrók” in historical record.

The Gesta Normannorum ducum was written about 1050-1070, and covered events from the 9th century up until the Norman Conquest. Apart from simply saying that Loðbrók was Danish, the text is significant because it is the first to make a connection between Loðbrók and Björn Ironside, and it also contains the first reference to Loðbrók as a king.

This is the beginning of the story that would become the whole complex legend of Ragnar Loðbrók, written down in a history of the Dukes of Normandy, who were descendants of Vikings themselves.

Current theories on the beginning of the Viking Age state that, if it began at all and didn’t just start, as it were, unofficially, it began with the attack on Lindisfarne in 793. Similarly, the end of the Viking Age is usually nailed down at 1066 with the Battle of Stamford Bridge, in which the Anglo-Saxons repelled the last Norse attack on England (only to be whupped by the Normans a few weeks later).

Now contrary to what the Vikings TV show has told you, Ragnar Loðbrók had nothing to do with Lindisfarne. But isn’t it fun that a TV show that portrays the start of the Viking Age as starring Ragnar Loðbrók has this wacky coincidental link with the first beginnings of the Ragnar Loðbrók legend in a history that ends with 1066?

I’m working on it!

I’m working on it!

(via vikings-confessions)

A blog that picks at the historicity of the History Channel's "Vikings" in the spirit of impotent nerdery.



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